DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES IN BRITAIN

by David Newland

is a guide to the best places to see all Britain's different butterfly species flying in the wild.

Since most butterflies are highly territorial and live and die in a small area, you must know where and when to look for them. This book tells you. Butterfly fortunes rise and fall, but if you look where the book suggests and in the right season, you shouldn't be disappointed.

The book's ISBN is 1903657121. You should be able to get a copy from any bookshop, or from Amazon uk, or direct from the publisher Princeton University Press.

After a wonderful late summer there are still some autumn butterflies on the wing, but not for much longer, and it will soon be time to prepare for next season. Painted Ladies and Clouded Yellows numbers were down on last year, but there were still a lot to see if you lived near the South Coast, and some of the rarer species like Silver-spotted Skippers and Lulworth Skippers were seen frequently if you were in the right place. That's where this book can help. Planning is the key to finding many of our butterfly species. You need to be in the right place at the right time!

 

Reports of my own sightings are on twitter and many other observers are posting their findings there.

What will 2015 bring? Now is the time to plan. What about using the book to plan where to go to find some of our rarer butterflies? Many people have seen all our 59 British and Irish species in the course of a few years (one species only occurs in Ireland). You just have to work out where to look and go there at the right time. That's what the book is for - to lead you to good places at the right time of year - so good luck if you try! 

In addition to the 66 sites suggested in the book, there are details of more places to go if you follow the Updates link below.

Done it all before - seen all 59 species?  Some people have!  Why not try our Day-Flying Moths instead?  Details are given below. Here's a taster Discovering Day-Flying Moths.

About the book:

DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES IN BRITAIN TELLS YOU WHERE TO LOOK TO FIND ALL OUR BREEDING SPECIES. THERE ARE PRECISE DETAILS OF WHERE TO SEE ALL THE RARE SPECIES WITH CLEAR INSTRUCTIONS AND MAPS. IF YOU GO WHERE THE BOOK RECOMMENDS, AT THE RIGHT TIME OF YEAR AND IN FINE WEATHER, YOU ARE UNLIKELY TO BE DISAPPOINTED.

ALL THE BUTTERFLIES ARE SHOWN BELOW. MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE BOOK AND SOME SPECIMEN PAGES FOLLOW AFTERWARDS.

There were 3 unsolicited endorsements in the press in 2009, when a number of journalists wrote about their personal searches for butterflies in Britain.  

Michael McCarthy in the Independent: We can recommend a book ... most of the locations we have reported are featured in the book (23.6.09),

Robin Page in the Weekend Telegraph: .... my safari helped inspire him to write his informative book (4.7.09) and

Stephen Moss in the Guardian: David Newland's excellent book (21.7.09)

The Independent's Great British Butterfly Hunt came to a triumphant conclusion on August Bank Holiday Monday. This book got a mention in Michael McCarthy's final report.

Look in the Updates section below for recent information on sites in the book and for new sites. One new site described there is Totternhoe Knolls. I can recommend it for Duke of Burgundy, Small and Chalkhill Blues and Dingy Skippers in season. There is currently a Wildlife Trust appeal to extend this site. This is a very worthy cause which I warmly support.

 

SEE BELOW FOR THE BUTTERFLIES TO LOOK FOR.

IF YOU NEED MORE HELP, THERE ARE FULL DETAILS IN OUR OTHER BOOK BRITAIN'S BUTTERFLIES.

ALL THE BUTTERFLIES OF BRITAIN AND IRELAND ARE DESCRIBED IN DETAIL IN BRITAIN'S BUTTERFLIES, WITH PHOTOGRAPHS OF ALL OF THEM, EACH WITH EGG, CATERPILLAR AND CHRYSALIS.

DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES IN BRITAIN TELLS YOU WHERE TO GO TO FIND THEM AND WHAT TO LOOK FOR WHEN YOU HAVE ARRIVED.

And if you are confused about whether you have seen a moth rather than a butterfly, our Day-flying Moths book should help.

Undoubtedly the book is one of the best and could be used to help one find and then identify Britain's butterflies with confidence.    Atropos, 42, 11, 73

BRITAIN'S DAY-FLYING MOTHS a field guide to the day-flying moths of Britain and Ireland 

published by Princeton University Press in 2013.

IT DESCRIBES THE DAY-FLYING MOTHS THAT YOU MAY COME ACROSS WHEN SEARCHING FOR BUTTERFLIES. Some like the Mother Shipton (cover picture) often fly alongside Dingy Skippers and are easily mistaken for them. 

"It is far and away the best of the books available" Entomologist's Record, Jan. 2014

 

THESE SIX BUTTERFLIES DON'T USUALLY APPEAR UNTIL JULY

Silver-spotted Skipper
Brown Hairstreak
Chalkhill Blue
Silver-washed Fritillary
Scotch Argus
Gatekeeper
THOSE IN THE NEXT BLOCK SHOULD APPEAR DURING JUNE
Small Skipper
Essex Skipper
Lulworth Skipper
Purple Hairstreak
White-letter Hairstreak
Black Hairstreak
Silver-studded Blue
Northern Brown Argus
Large Blue
White Admiral
Purple Emperor
Dark Green Fritillary
High Brown Fritillary
Mountain Ringlet
Marbled White
Grayling
Meadow Brown
Ringlet
Large Heath
FROM THIS ROW ONWARDS, BUTTERFLIES
USUALLY FIRST APPEAR IN MAY
 
Real's Wood White
Large Skipper
Swallowtail
 
Wood White
Clouded Yellow
Small Copper
Small Blue
Brown Argus
Common Blue
Adonis Blue
Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary
Marsh Fritillary
Glanville Fritillary
Heath Fritillary
Wall
THE BUTTERFLIES STARTING IN THIS ROW ARE THE FIRST TO EMERGE AND PROBABLY TOOK FLIGHT IN APRIL
Chequered Skipper
Dingy Skipper
Grizzled Skipper
Brimstone
Large White
Small White
Green-veined White
Orange Tip
Green Hairstreak
Holly Blue
Duke of Burgundy
Red Admiral
Painted Lady
Small Tortoiseshell
Peacock
Comma
Pearl-bordered Fritillary
Speckled Wood
Small Heath

Now some inside information about

DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES IN BRITAIN:

DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES IN BRITAIN is a guide to where to see butterflies,
with descriptions, maps and photographs of 66 good sites.
Click on the images below for sample pages; use the back button to return for your next selection.
If the pages do not appear full screen, look for the expand button by moving your pointer over the bottom right of each picture.


The full list of contents is given here.
 
Many of the site descriptions are supported by poems by Tricia Newland.
 
Links to PUBLISHED REVIEWS may be found here.
 
Comments and suggestions already received from readers are summarised here.
 
How I wrote the book, RECENT SIGHTINGS and more photos are here.
 
UPDATES are given here. There are full details of 21 new sites.

 

A recent article on butterfly photography is here.
 
A new project BUTTERFLIES IN EUROPE is described here.
It includes articles on Swallowtails in Provence (an article for BC's European Interest Group). This article asks why
continental Swallowtails have their curious hill-topping behaviour. Dr Torben B Larsen has recently emailed a very convincing
explanation, based on his personal observations of butterfly behaviour in West Africa. There is a link to Dr Larsen's explanation
in this section. Also there is article on the Gavarnie Blue, which is one of the rarest European butterflies, found only in the Gavarnie region of the Pyrenees.
And, finally, there is a request for help in identifying some difficult European species.
 
 
DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES IN BRITAIN may be obtained direct from WILDGuides, telephone orderline 01628 529297,
or from Butterfly Conservation, telephone orderline 0870 774 4309, or from www.amazon.co.uk or from most booksellers.
It is stocked by Heffers, Trinity Street, Cambridge and is available by mail order from
www.heffers.co.uk which connects with their parent company Blackwell Online.
 
 
A contribution will be made to Butterfly Conservation for every book sold.
 
More information on how to obtain the book is given here.
A companion book BRITAIN'S BUTTERFLIES is also published by WILDGuides (details from WILDGuides web site).
This is about identifying butterflies and their eggs, caterpillars and chrysalises, whereas DISCOVER BUTTERFLIES
IN BRITAIN is about where to find them while also visiting the best of the British countryside.